Sizes: carte de visite, cabinet and large format
Item#: F-031 Artist: various
Image or title: Archive of Korean and Japanese photographs from the estate of Japanese acedemic Hiroshi Shidehara.
Date: 1890s to 1910s Medium: albumen prints, pop, gelatin silver prints Price: ¥200,000 JPY

Description:

This is an archive of 22 photographs from the estate of Japanese acedemic Hiroshi Shidehara that dates from the mid 1890s. Shidehara was the brother of the prominent Japanese diplomat and statesman Kijuro Shidehara (read below). This includes photographs by photo studios in Korea, Japan, and London. All but one of the images is inscribed by the sitter. The condition of these photos vary with a few showing some signs of fading, while the others are in excellent condition. Overall, this is a nice lot.
 
Hiroshi Shidehara (1870-1953): Born into an Osaka samurai family, Shidehara attended school at Tokyo Teikoku Daigaku (Tokyo Imperial University), the forerunner of Tokyo University. He later became a teacher there, and in the 1890s spent time in Korea as an academic when his younger brother Kijuro was a diplomat there. He also worked for the Japanese government and also became the first President of Taihoku Imperial University, now National Taiwan University, as well as a university president in Korea. There is an archive of Korean books collected at the Toyo Bunko Oriental Library in Tokyo called the Shidehara Hiroshi Collection of Korean Books. He also wrote a book on Korea entitled Kankoku Seisoshi.
Baron Kijuro Shidehara (1872-1951): Japanese diplomat, statesman, and prime minister for a brief period after World War II (1945–46). He was so closely identified with the peaceful foreign policy followed by Japan in the 1920s that this policy is usually referred to as Shidehara diplomacy. Shidehara entered the diplomatic service in 1899 and served in Korea, London, Washington, and The Netherlands. As ambassador to the United States in 1919, he argued against U.S. immigration laws discriminating against the Japanese. He was the chief Japanese delegate to the Washington Conference (1921–22). As foreign minister of Japan from 1924 to 1927 and again from 1929 to 1931, Shidehara became known as an advocate of a conciliatory policy toward China and a policy of economic rather than military expansion. He was forced from office by the militarists in 1931, but continued to be held in high regard abroad. He again played a significant role in Japanese politics in October 1945, when, at the age of 73, he was accepted by the American military occupation authorities as prime minister. He held office until the end of the demilitarization period in May 1946. He was then elected as a conservative to the lower house of the Diet (parliament), where he served as speaker until his death. His wife was also the daughter of the head of the Mitsubishi industrial combine.
  Photos taken in Korea (9):


Cabinet portrait of Shidehara Hiroshi in Korea, autographed in German on print and on the reverse "An Herrn Dr. Shidehara" or “a gentleman Dr. Shidehara” Photo by S. Higuchi studio, Chemulpo (Japanese name for Inchon), late 1890s.


Cabinet portrait of Shidehara Hiroshi in Korea, autographed "Yours Truly H. Shidehara", by Y. Takeshita, Pusan, ca. mid to late 1890s.


Cabinet of Tomita family in Korea, inscribed to Shidehara Kendai (an honorific title) from Tomita Koji, at Jinsen Port (Inchon), June, 1899 (Meiji '32). Portrait by S. Higuchi studio, Chemulpo (Japanese name for Inchon).


CDV of Japanese officer Tamura Katsuichi in Korea, inscribed to Shidehara Ryoji (Consul name of Shidehara Kijiro ), by the studio of T. Doi, Pusan, May 26, 1905 (Meiji '35).


Victoria carte of Shimao Senkichi in Korea, inscribed and dated by this Japanese national. Taken by the Japanese studio T. Doi, Pusan, May 27, 1905 (Meiji '38).


CDV of Japanese in Korea, inscribed “To Shidehara my elder university brother (Gakuani), from Yamaguchi, March, 1898 (Meiji '31). Taken by the Japanese studio S. Higuchi studio, Chemulpo (Japanese name for Inchon). This sitter was a classmate of Shidehara.


Cabinet of Japanese in Korea, portrait of Sugihara, inscribed to Shidehara in Korea, July 19, 1901 (Meiji '34). Unattributed Korean photo studio (this is a very unusual card mount, nothing like it has ever been seen used by Japanese studios during the same period).


Cabinet of Suzuki family in Korea, inscribed to Shidehara from Suzuki Shichiro. Taken by S. Higuchi studio, Chemulpo (Japanese name for Inchon), July, 1898 (Meiji '31).


Cabinet of Fukuma Takaie in Korea, inscribed to Shidehara, Sept, 1898 (Meiji '31). Taken by Y. Takeshita studio, Pusan.
  Photo taken in Japan, inscribed in Korea (3):


Cabinet of naval officer Matsumura Toyonori, inscribed to Shidehara August, 1898 (Meiji '31) in Korea. Taken by Y. Nonogaki studio, Hiroshima.


Cabinet of naval officer Yamada Atsushi (or Jun), inscribed to Shidehara at Jinsen Port, April 2, 1898 (Meiji '31). Taken by S. Ichida studio, Kobe.


CDV of Tojo Saburo, inscribed to Consul Shidehara at Jinsen Port (Inchon), May, 1899 (Meiji '32). Taken by Suzuki Shinichi II studio, Tokyo.
  Photographed, inscribed by Japanese in England to Shidehara Kijiro (2):


Victorian carte of Arakawa Jiro, inscribed to Shidehara Kijiro, taken by Lena Connell Studio London, Dec. 1900 (Meiji '33). This was when Shidehara was a diplomat in England.


Victorian carte of Nagii Rokuro, inscribed to Shidehara Kijiro, taken by Lena Connell Studio London, Dec. 11, 1900 (Meiji '33).
  Photographed in Japan, Inscribed in Japan to Shidehara (8):


Portrait of Korean or Taiwanese gentleman, inscribed by the sitter “Shidehara Sensei wo Keizon” or “for Dr. Shidehara”. The signature is in non Japanese kanji, so this person’s name is unreadable. Taken by Ichida Studio, Kobe, ca. 1915-1920. Large format toned bromide gelatin silver print. Ichida Sota II: Birth name name Kojima Hidejiro, the adapted son of Kobe photo pioneer Ichida Sota I. The family run Ichida studio was in operation from 1867 to 1870 in Kyoto, then moved to Kobe where it flourished as the most successful photo studio in the city from the early Meiji period until it ceased operations in the early 1930s.


Portrait of Korean or Taiwanese socialite, inscribed by the sitter and addressed to Mrs. Shidehara Megumi. The signature is in non Japanese kanji, so this woman’s name is unreadable. Taken by the popular Maruki studio of Tokyo, ca. 1915-1920. Large format toned bromide gelatin silver print. Maruki Ryo (1850-1923): Maruki operated one of the most successful photo studios in Tokyo from 1880 to 1923. He was a well respected titan in the Japanese photo community and his studio is presumed to have perished in the great Kanto Earthquake of 1923.


Cabinet portrait of an identified baron, no inscriptions, Hasegawa Studio, Tokyo, ca. 1910.


Portrait of Korean or Taiwanese gentleman in traditional fashion, inscribed to Shidehara and dated in non Japanese kanji, so unable to translate. Taken by Morikawa Aizo studio of Tokyo, lovely pictorialism style print from Taisho period. Large format toned bromide gelatin silver print.

Morikawa Aizo: Born in 1877, around 1897 Morikawa apprenticed at the Takeyabashi Studio in Sapporo, owned and operated by Tokiwa Mishima. Ten years later he worked under photo great Kazumasa Ogawa of Tokyo. Not long after that he went to work for the Komura Photo Studio of Tokyo, gaining the reputation as the studio's most skilled photographer. It's not exactly known when he opened his own studio in Tokyo, the Morikawa Shashin Kan (Morikawa Photo Studio), but by 1925 he's listed in the Asahi Photo Annual. Also during the 1920s he was the chairman of the Kyobashi Shashin Kumiai (Kyobashi Photographic Association). A Christian, Morikawa died in 1949 at the age of 72.



Cabinet of decorated naval officer Jimbei Noritada, inscribed to Shidehara “older brother”, January, 1904 (Meiji ' 37). Taken by Tango Kanihiro studio, Shibata City (Lake Suwa).


CDV of Tokyo Teikoku Daigaku student. Portrait of student Nagahama Kenkichi inscribed to his teacher Shidehara Hiroshi. Shidehara was a teacher at Tokyo Teikoku Daigaku (Tokyo Imperial University), the forerunner of Tokyo University. Taken by the Osaka studio of Seiei-do, late 1880s.


CDV of Tokyo Teikoku Daigaku student. Portrait of student Miyahama Nagaichi (or Choichiro) inscribed to his teacher Shidehara Hiroshi, February 1, 1889 (Meiji 22). Shidehara was a teacher at Tokyo Teikoku Daigaku (Tokyo Imperial University), the forerunner of Tokyo University. Taken by the Osaka studio of Akira Sanuki studio.


CDV of Tokyo Teikoku Daigaku student. Portrait of student J. Shibahara inscribed in Japanese and English to his teacher Shidehara Hiroshi, May, Meiji Eto year (1889?). Shidehara was a teacher at Tokyo Teikoku Daigaku (Tokyo Imperial University), the forerunner of Tokyo University. Unattributed studio, possibly in Osaka.